THE NEIGHBORS CALLED IT "FREW'S FOLLY,"

though the reason remains obscure. Perhaps it was the chrome yellow trim, a shocking contrast to the plank and log style houses common to the back country. It is unknown when the house became known as Rosedale. Originally part of a 919 acre plantation, Rosedale was built in 1815 by Archibald Frew, who was a merchant, postmaster and tax collector. The house was occupied from the 1830s by D. T. Caldwell and his family. Dr. Caldwell, in addition to his medical practice, ran the plantation with the support of 2 slave families consisting of about 20 people. Rosedale is one of the finest examples of Federal period architecture in North Carolina and is noted for its faux grained woodwork and the original French wallpaper that survives in three rooms.

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